Showroom Design Cost Management Vol.2, Issue 5

Planning & Display Strategies For Your Showroom

 Vol.2, Issue 5

 

daveBreaker

While you are designing your new/remodeled showroom floor plan, here are some strategies to consider during the design process.

1. Parking lot & customer entryway- Parking areas should be clean, neat and well lit. Separate the contractor entry from your retail entry. Seasonal adornments and outdoor speakers playing pleasing music all add to a welcoming atmosphere.

2. Welcome area and refreshments- Upon entering, your customers should be greeted and offered refreshments, a place to sit and relax and be allowed to browse your “boutique” for a few minutes while waiting for assistance.

3. Circulation- This is very important; balancing the need to display a large variety of products while maintaining a spacious look, allowing room for growth and most importantly, following handicap clearances required by law.

4. Staff Offices- Establish your offices in close proximity to the showroom lobby and work areas. Confidential information should be put away when leaving to assist other customers.

5. Work area within the showroom- When sales staff are working with clients it is very helpful for your staff to leave their desk as is, to meet with clients on the showroom floor rather than bring them to their desks. If possible plan an outside space as an option on nice days.

6. Working displays, sinks, showers and tubs- Most every up-to-date showroom has working display’s of some type. Consider those locations for cost savings early during the planning stage.

7. Lighting- Anyone that has worked with me knows I feel lighting is the single, most important element to effectively display your merchandise.

8. Washrooms- Make your washrooms working displays. This creates is an opportunity to build up your customer base by using a local designer/customer to help with the decorating.

9. Aging-In-Place Products- This is a large and growing segment of our society & should not be overlooked in showroom planning.

10. Designer Areas- More and more professionals come to showrooms with clients and prefer to be left to work without a third person involved. Provide space, maybe a video monitor, internet access and refreshments.

11. Training Room-Break Room- Having the space to train is very helpful when sales reps come in for a “lunch and learn” or present new product lines. Any lunchroom should be remote from the main showroom.

12. The closet, electrical, lighting controls, and internet- This space may already be in place. However, it has been an issue in the last few showrooms where an extra closet made sense for expanded use of electronic equipment being called upon for showroom upgrades.

13. Storage of support materials- There never seems to enough room for literature, paper, design books.

14. Showroom access- Most showrooms have direct access to the sales floor from the warehouse. Layout the showroom floor so that you don’t have to move a dozen things to switch out one item, or have to bring things in through the front door.

15. Internet sales area- Does your showroom need a “will call” area? If you are palnning for internet sales, you will want a pick-up/storage area.

This is the fifth in a series of 12 topics outlining successful Showroom Design Cost Management. Look for next month’s topic:Preparing for Showroom Displays.

Contact David Hawkins for a FREE Showroom Design Consultation!

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